Glory Records

Music and Studying

can you listen to music and study at the same time ?

Plenty of people swear by music as a helpful tool for studying and working. Others find it impossible to concentrate with any background noise at all.

Music does offer a lot of benefits, including:

  • improved mood
  • increased motivation
  • improved memory and brain stimulation
  • better management of pain and fatigue

With these in mind, it might seem fairly logical that music can improve your study sessions. But not everyone agrees. So what’s the deal — does it help or not?

Music doesn’t affect everyone in the same way, so the answer to this question is more complex than a straightforward “yes” or “no.”

That said, it’s certainly true that some types of music can boost concentration and memory as well as increase alertness.

Keep reading to learn more about the pros and cons of studying with music and get some tips for making the most out of your study playlist.

It would be fantastic if you could put on a playlist or song that could help you knock out a problem set or memorize all those dates for your history final, wouldn’t it?

Unfortunately, music isn’t quite that powerful. It mostly helps in indirect ways, but those benefits can still make a big difference.

Listening to music while you study or work doesn’t always make you less productive or efficient.

If you prefer to study with music, there’s no need to give it up. Keeping these tips in mind can help you find the most helpful music for work and study:

  • Avoid music with lyrics. Any music that has lyrics in a language you understand will probably prove more distracting than helpful.
  • Choose slow, instrumental musicExisting research generally focuses on classical music, but if you don’t enjoy this genre, you could also consider soft electronic, space, or ambient — the kind you might hear at a spa or while getting a massage.
  • Avoid surprising or experimental music. Music that changes abruptly or lacks a fixed rhythm can leave you guessing about what to expect. This can distract your brain and keep you from focusing on your work.
  • Keep the volume low. Study music should stay at a background volume. If it’s too loud, it could disrupt your thinking process.
  • Stick to songs you don’t have strong feelings about. Listening to music you either love or hate can affect your ability to concentrate.
  • Stream commercial-free music, if possible. Picture this: You’re listening to your instrumental Pandora station when a toilet paper commercial cuts in, annoying you and derailing your train of thought. Enough said.

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